Hi guys <3

fitanne:

It’s about time I sit down and write a post explaining what’s going to happen. If you’ve enjoyed following this blog, you might want to read on. This is not easy for me to write, because my tumblr-people have and always will have a special place in my heart. But I’m leaving tumblr, possibly forever.

It’s only been a week and a half since I started at uni, and so much have happend. I love it so much here. And that means my priorities are changing. It’s going to be hard, and I want to get top grades - that means studying a lot, not spending all night blogging. I want to start playing football again, and I have friends here! I love it so much, and there’s one thing that absolutely sucks, but he doesn’t take all the good things away from it.

I was meeting with some friends yesterday, and they said it was obvious this is the right place for me, I was glowing. And I do feel happy, and I want to spend all my time and energy on this.

Maybe it’s a bit ambitious, but I want to try to send a personal goodbye message all of you I feel like I’ve become friends with and feel close to on here. You truly are an amazing bunch of people, and I hope we can stay in contact. I’ll be deleting fit-anne.com (saving my posts locally) along with my facebook page.

STAY IN TOUCH WITH ME!

  • Facebook - I only add people I know, so feel free to add me if we were mutuals (followed each other) - you can message me if I don’t add you at first. We don’t need to be facebook friends for you to send me a message there.
  • Mail annestkrarup@gmail.com - you can send me a mail directly, or message me on Imessage (I don’t have kik)
  • Instagram: @annekrarup just add me so we can stay in touch
  • Snapchat: annetkrarup

I will not be completely deleting my blog (as you requested), but I will be deleting a lot of posts, mainly personal posts. You can still find and overview of all my helpful posts here.

That also means you can still message me here, but I’m not going to answer anymore anonymous ‘how to lose weight’ and other fitness/health advice questions. I won’t be online often, so contact me elsewhere if you need a faster reply :)

I hope you will continue posting #Selflovesunday pictures after I’m gone, because you’re wonderful and need to tell yourself that as often as possible. Take care my friends <3

PS I still have some posts in my queue, so you might still see posts from my blog the next couple of days

PPS THANK YOU FOR BEING FREAKING AWESOME I LOVE YOU

~Until we meet again~

I’ll end this message with a question so everyone can reply?

This is the end of the queue, and my blog for now. I miss and love you guys, and I’m sorry I’ve been so slow at replying to you various places <3

noizs-nipples:

adriofthedead:

kumagawa:

in the tumblr tagging system, unsourced artwork is considered especially heinous. on this blogging platform, the users who source these felonies are part of an elite task force called the source your fucking artwork unit. these are their stories.

image

image

(via efosworld)

startersteps:

Do You Have a Friend Like This?
You may have a well-meaning friend who is excited to involve you in their activities. Jen Sinkler posted the above exchange in a blog entry, “If you don’t like it, don’t do it.” It’s nice to be included, and if the answer is, “OK! Let me know if you ever want to!” that’s one thing, but sometimes the answer is a bit guilt-trippy.
If you are making a new commitment to exercise, you will meet many people who will say that exercise must “challenge” you — or even that “goals that don’t scare you are not big enough.” They may even tell you that a hesitation to buy into this view is “just making excuses.” In fact, this is something you get to decide for yourself. If you get excited about improving your performance, and even decide you want to compete — or just test yourself in an event with official scoring — that’s wonderful. It’s also wonderful if you’d frankly rather read a book, and you also happen to have a regular exercise plan.
Sinkler talked about this on Twitter, where others joined in to say things like, “You don’t seem like someone who ever backs away from a challenge.” Jen talks about the “tough it out” culture in fitness and how it sets people up for failure and burnout. Another problem with the “tough it out” culture is that it defines “working out” as something unpleasant or even punishing, whose best goal is performance in competition with others, and those definitions are neither true nor helpful. We all need to have exercise in our lives, and there’s no requirement to get punished in the process. On the contrary, you’ll have a more consistent experience — and probably get more out of it — if you skip the punishment.
Jen Sinkler enjoys competition but not running, biking, or swimming. I enjoy running, biking, and swimming but not competition. There are lots of ways to have exercise in your life in a way that you enjoy, that helps you grow, and that makes you feel better and do more.
What is your favorite way to get exercise into your life? Is there something you’d like to know more about?

startersteps:

Do You Have a Friend Like This?

You may have a well-meaning friend who is excited to involve you in their activities. Jen Sinkler posted the above exchange in a blog entry, “If you don’t like it, don’t do it.” It’s nice to be included, and if the answer is, “OK! Let me know if you ever want to!” that’s one thing, but sometimes the answer is a bit guilt-trippy.

If you are making a new commitment to exercise, you will meet many people who will say that exercise must “challenge” you — or even that “goals that don’t scare you are not big enough.” They may even tell you that a hesitation to buy into this view is “just making excuses.” In fact, this is something you get to decide for yourself. If you get excited about improving your performance, and even decide you want to compete — or just test yourself in an event with official scoring — that’s wonderful. It’s also wonderful if you’d frankly rather read a book, and you also happen to have a regular exercise plan.

Sinkler talked about this on Twitter, where others joined in to say things like, “You don’t seem like someone who ever backs away from a challenge.” Jen talks about the “tough it out” culture in fitness and how it sets people up for failure and burnout. Another problem with the “tough it out” culture is that it defines “working out” as something unpleasant or even punishing, whose best goal is performance in competition with others, and those definitions are neither true nor helpful. We all need to have exercise in our lives, and there’s no requirement to get punished in the process. On the contrary, you’ll have a more consistent experience — and probably get more out of it — if you skip the punishment.

Jen Sinkler enjoys competition but not running, biking, or swimming. I enjoy running, biking, and swimming but not competition. There are lots of ways to have exercise in your life in a way that you enjoy, that helps you grow, and that makes you feel better and do more.

What is your favorite way to get exercise into your life? Is there something you’d like to know more about?

(via the-exercist)

versesofmind:

recovering from an eating disorder is extremely fucking challenging. you have to face your fears every day, multiple times a day. high five to all those fighting and keep trying for those stuck in lapse { ily all }

(via kickingassand-takingnames)